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ENCOUNT3RS

April 21, 2017
alberta ballet caelestis

Jean Grand-Maître’s Caelestis, photograph by Michael Slobodian

Reviewed April 20, 2017

NAC Southam Hall, Ottawa

(Repeat performances Friday & Saturday, April 21 & 22, 8:00 p.m.)

It’s so Canadian! Three of Canada’s best ballet companies performing contemporary ballet works by three of Canada’s best dance choreographers, accompanied by the sound of three of Canada’s best young musicians.

The idea of premiering such a show at the National Arts Centre on the eve of Canada 150 sprung from the minds of NAC’s dance executive producer Cathy Levy and music director Alexander Shelley a few years ago.

And so, with Shelley in the pit with his orchestra providing live accompaniment, the Ottawa audience experienced some of Canada’s best creative minds at work on the stage this week.

ENCOUNT3RS, overall, is a somewhat “dark” presentation, from Jean Grand-Maître’s Caelestis, which opens the show, to Guillaume Côté’s Dark Angels, which wraps it up.

alberta ballet caelestis 2

Alberta Ballet dancers perform in Caelestis, photograph by Michael Slobodian

The former, danced by 10 Alberta Ballet artists, focuses on the intrigue of shapes – not only the shapes of the dancers individually as they crawl, claw, hang or reach, but also the shape of the duets and the shape of the group as a whole as the dancers come together as one large beast. 

The shaping is even more pronounced against the stark lighting that is projected onto the back of the stage and the floor. A video design by Wendy Tilby and Amanda Forbis moves continuously, so that it becomes its own entity in the work. The skin of the dancers – the men are bare-chested – reflects a pale golden light in contrast to the mostly black-and-white seemingly random fast-moving images.

Collaborating with Grand-Maître, composer Andrew Staniland created a three-movement score he says is inspired by what is known as “the golden ratio” of Phi, and towards the end incorporates readings of quotes from Euclid’s “The laws of nature are but the mathematical thoughts of God.”

Côté’s Dark Angels carries a loneliness through the work, even within the duets, but often switches suddenly into fleeting moments of love or joy, all patterned beautifully on the stage by the 10 National Ballet of Canada dancers.

guillaume cote's dark angels

National Ballet performs Guillaume Côté’s Dark Angels

Kevin Lau, who collaborated with Côté for the work, fresh from their first collaboration on the ballet Le Petit Prince, feeds the desperate and energetic movements with a brilliant piece of music that threatens with its persistent drums and soulful strings, and just a dash of the exotic.

Lastly, and kind of least, sandwiched between these two numbers, is a somewhat draggy ballet called Keep Driving, I’m Dreaming, choreographed by Emily Molnar for eight Ballet BC dancers. Molnar says she was inspired by the dancers’ responses to her query, “If you were to put your life on hold, where would you go?” And while the dancers have an opportunity to show off their amazing individual skills, the piece lacks creativity.

“Musical scientist” Nicole Lizée, who says she drew her inspiration for the collaboration from the neo-noir cinema of the 1980s and 1990s, and who likes to mix old and new sounds and capture the glitches of outdated technology, has created a dissonant, overly electronic angry accompaniment to the work.

 

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From → Ballet, Contemporary

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